Category Archives: What are your rights in a traffic stop

beating

Cops Beat Man in Streets After “Illegal U-Turn”

NEW YORK — A disturbing video has surfaced online showing officers beat a man after pulling him over for an “illegal U-turn.”

The victim is Timothy Nelson, 24.

Timothy did acknowledge that he made an illegal turn and double parked to pick up some food.

But he was stunned when officers began beating him, displaying needless force instead of simply issuing him a ticket.

The video begins right when Timothy is pulled over.

The officers ask for his paperwork and he cooperates by giving it to them.

That’s when the unthinkable happens.

“He was punching me, three times. He punched my face and nose. I have a chipped fracture in the right side of my nose.”

Witnesses gathered nearby and were startled to see the man being beaten.
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ahole

How Traffic Stops for License Plates, Tail Lights, Seatbelts Can be a Death Sentence in Police State USA

Drivers, Beware: The Costly, Deadly Dangers of Traffic Stops in the American Police State

“The Fourth Amendment was designed to stand between us and arbitrary governmental authority. For all practical purposes, that shield has been shattered, leaving our liberty and personal integrity subject to the whim of every cop on the beat, trooper on the highway and jail official. The framers would be appalled.”—Herman Schwartz, The Nation

Trying to predict the outcome of any encounter with the police is a bit like playing Russian roulette: most of the time you will emerge relatively unscathed, although decidedly poorer and less secure about your rights, but there’s always the chance that an encounter will turn deadly.

The odds weren’t in Walter L. Scott’s favor. Reportedly pulled over for a broken taillight, Scott—unarmed—ran away from the police officer, who pursued and shot him from behind, first with a Taser, then with a gun. Scott was struck five times, “three times in the back, once in the upper buttocks and once in the ear — with at least one bullet entering his heart.”

Samuel Dubose, also unarmed, was pulled over for a missing front license plate. He was reportedly shot in the head after a brief struggle in which his car began rolling forward.

Levar Jones was stopped for a seatbelt offense, just as he was getting out of his car to enter a convenience store. Directed to show his license, Jones leaned into his car to get his wallet, only to be shot four times by the “fearful” officer. Jones was also unarmed.

Bobby Canipe was pulled over for having an expired registration. When the 70-year-old reached into the back of his truck for his walking cane, the officer fired several shots at him, hitting him once in the abdomen.

Dontrell Stevens was stopped “for not bicycling properly.” The officer pursuing him “thought the way Stephens rode his bike was suspicious. He thought the way Stephens got off his bike was suspicious.” Four seconds later, sheriff’s deputy Adams Lin shot Stephens four times as he pulled out a black object from his waistband. The object was his cell phone. Stephens was unarmed.

If there is any lesson to be learned from these “routine” traffic stops, it is that drivers should beware.
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dumbanddumber

Florida Cops Disciplined for Pulling Man Over in Armored Car After He Flipped Them Off

The camouflage-wearing Florida cops who made international news last month when they used an armored car to pull a man over for flipping them off were disciplined, including one Alachua County Sheriff’s Sergeant who was suspended without pay for a day.

Perhaps now they will acknowledge that citizens do that have the right to flip them off, even though we all can agree it is a rude gesture.

Even if they are dressed like Rambo to oversee an annual college football festival titled Orange and Blue Weekend.

Or perhaps they just need to “grow a thicker skin,” as the investigative report concluded, which was obtained by the Gainesville Sun last week.

Now the sergeant who initiated the traffic stop, Kevin Davis, will also have to write a new policy for the agency, which will outline the situations when the armored car, officially titled the Lenco Bearcat Armored Personnel Carrier (APC), will be allowed to make traffic stops. We hope he makes it clear that contempt-of-cop traffic stops are forbidden

Sgt. Kevin Davis was issued one day of suspension without pay by Sheriff Sadie Darnell herself, and Deputy Richard Howell was given a written reprimand.

dumbanddumber

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Highway seizure in Iowa fuels debate about asset-forfeiture laws

The two men in the rented red Nissan Altima were poker players traveling through Iowa on their way to Las Vegas. The police were state troopers on the hunt for criminals, contraband and cash.

They intersected last year on a rural stretch of Interstate 80, in a seemingly routine traffic stop that would soon raise new questions about laws that allow police to take money and property from people not charged with crimes.

By the time the encounter was over, the gamblers had been detained for more than two hours. Their car was searched without a warrant. And their cellphones, a computer and $100,020 of their gambling “bankroll” were seized under state civil asset-forfeiture laws. The troopers allowed them to leave, without their money, after issuing a traffic warning and a citation for possession of marijuana paraphernalia that carried a $65 fine, court records show.

Months later, an attorney for the men obtained a video of the stop. It showed that the motorists were detained for a violation they did not commit — a failure to signal during a lane change — and authorities were compelled to return 90 percent of the money.

Now the men are questioning the police tactics in an unusual federal civil rights lawsuit. In the suit, filed Sept. 29, William Barton Davis, 51, and John Newmer­zhycky, 43, both from Humboldt County, Calif., claim their constitutional rights against unreasonable searches and seizures were violated. They also contend the stop was part of a pattern connected to the teachings of a private police-training firm that promotes aggressive tactics.

Davis is a professional poker player, and Newmerzhycky worked as glass blower, according to court records. In an interview, Davis said the men felt as though they were being “stalked” by the police.

If allowed to proceed, the lawsuit could illuminate the widespread but little-known police practice known as “highway interdiction.” The suit names Desert Snow, the Oklahoma-based training firm, and its founder, Joe David, court records show. It also names the two Iowa State Patrol troopers who participated in the traffic stop and were trained by Desert Snow.

aholes

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Stupid Cop thinsk a french fry is a joint.

The ludicrous “war on drugs” violates another person’s rights.

Semi-famous rapper, Joe Mugga, was out with some friends when Fairview Township Police officer, Michael Bennage pulled him over for a burnt out license plate light.

As he was reviewing Mugga’s license and registration (papers), Bennage tried to open the back door to of his vehicle; no consent was given, no warrant was obtained.

Bennage demands that Mugga open the door. “For what?” Mugga replies.

Bennage then reaches inside the vehicle, unlocks the door, and yanks Mugga out of his own car.

All of the occupants were told to exit the vehicle and sit on the curb while Bennage ransacked the vehicle looking for drugs.

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What are the rights of passengers during a traffic stop?

Traffic stops typically occur as a result of suspected moving violations committed by the driver of the vehicle. Passengers cannot be held responsible for the driver’s conduct and are generally free to leave, unless police become suspicious of them during the course of the stop.

Unfortunately, this happens frequently and the amount of evidence required to detain passengers is minimal. For this reason, passengers must remember to refuse search requests and refrain from answering questions without an attorney present. Police who suspect criminal activity will often separate the occupants of an automobile and question them separately. If their stories differ, this could lead officers to claim that they have probable cause to prolong the detention or conduct a search.

As with any other brief detention, the best way to handle this situation is to determine if you can leave by asking ”Officer, are you detaining me, or am I free to go?”